Saturday, May 14, 2011
Traveling To Russia : What To Pack
Whether you are traveling to Russia to adopt or to bring your adopted Russian child on a cultural experience it is good to know what is useful to pack.

We traveled to Russia three times over the course of our adoption and we bought a lot of stuff that people recommended, but only some of it was really useful.

This is what I recommend

Packing list for Russia

airplane pillow
book
wallet/purse
ipod
make-up (women)
dramamine (if needed)
I.D.
necessary papers, tickets
nice shirts (everyone dresses nice there)
nice pants (shorts will make you look like a tourist)
sweater/coat (if necessary)
toiletries
socks
sandals
comfortable shoes
underclothing
pajamas
swimsuit (if wanted)
medicine (Tylenol, ibuprofen, scabies cream if adopting)
face wash/lotion
shampoo/conditioner
brush
camera (charged)
toothbrush/paste
razor
toiletries
lap top
travel voltage converter (for outlet)
video camera (charged)- If adopting, video as much of the orphanage as you can inside and out. We were too nervous/excited to film as much as we should have. The little video we have is so valuable now. Piney has watched it several times and it helps her deal with her past.


If adopting:
diapers
wipes
change of clothes for child,
child coat, gloves (if winter)
buy shoes in Russia as you won't know size
donations

Things you may not have thought of:

band-aids - ( I needed one when I was there- my feet were getting blisters from walking- and I couldn't get anyone to understand what I was talking about)

Franklin Speaking 14 Language Translator with Merriam-Webster Dictionary EST-5014- This proved invaluable in the subway when we got lost. We typed in "How do we get out of here- then the electronic thing changed it to Russian and we were able to show it to people who directed us. No one speaks English there.

If traveling in winter- super warm coats (Its freezing). I recommend Lands End coats.

Franklin Language Travel Phrase Card Translator (ET-2011 11) - we had this in actual paper cards with the translation, but I couldn't find them anymore. This looks like the same idea, yet less bulky.

We purchased a Russian cartoon in Russia and a music CD (make sure they are compatible with U.S. CD/DVD players) to play for our daughter upon her arrival home (which was 2 years old). Neither the cartoons or music ever appealed to her, but they might be something she cherishes in the future.

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1 Comments:
Anonymous Anonymous said...
Hey! I've been reading your blog for god-knows how long now (well before you adopted the princess), and I just wanted to say it's been a fascinating story to follow

:)

Luisa

(I'm at girltoworld.blogspot.com, though I barely keep it up)

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